Learn more. “It's Not Whether You Win Or Lose, It's How You Place The Blame: Assessing Perceptions of Blame for the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill.” Rural Sociology, 81:295-315, Cope, Michael James; Slack, Tim; Blanchard, Troy C.; and Lee, Matthew R., "It's Not Whether You Win or Lose, It's How You Place the Blame: Shifting Perceptions of Recreancy in the Context of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill" (2016). Using household survey data from the Community Oil Spill Survey (COSS) to assess recreancy in the context of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, we analyze four waves of the COSS collected between 2010 and 2013 to explore respondents’ perceptions of blame and distrust in relation to key institutional actors associated with the disaster, paying special attention to the influence of time and employment in natural resource occupations. Citing Literature. Cope, Michael R., Tim Slack, Troy C. Blanchard, and Matthew R. Lee. FAQ | Data are publicly available through the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative Information & Data Cooperative (GRIIDC) at https://data.gulfresearchinitiative.org (doi: 10.7266/N7T72FDS, 10.7266/N7PG1PP2, 10.7266/N7JQ0XZB, 10.7266/N7DZ068V). A key theoretical concept in the study of technological disasters is “recreancy,” which refers to perception that institutional actors have failed to carry out their responsibilities in a manner that engenders societal trust. Please check your email for instructions on resetting your password. About | Accessibility Statement. Troy C. Blanchard We find high levels of distrust of BP and the federal government, but show that odds of being distrustful of both institutional actors was significantly lower three years after the spill. Use the link below to share a full-text version of this article with your friends and colleagues. Recommend to friends. Read more quotes from Grantland Rice. “It's not whether you win or lose, it's how you play the game.” ― Grantland Rice tags: paraphrased. If you have previously obtained access with your personal account, Using household survey data from the Community Oil Spill Survey (COSS) to assess recreancy in the context of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, we analyze four waves of the COSS collected between 2010 and 2013 to explore respondents’ perceptions of blame and distrust in relation to key institutional actors associated with the disaster, paying special attention to the influence of time and employment in natural resource occupations. Unlimited viewing of the article PDF and any associated supplements and figures. Tim Slack Fishing households were significantly more likely to blame and be distrustful of institutional actors, a finding that is strongly consistent with theoretical expectations. Cope, Michael R., Tim Slack, Troy C. Blanchard, and Matthew R. Lee. Friends Who Liked This Quote. > My Account | and you may need to create a new Wiley Online Library account. A key theoretical concept in the study of technological disasters is “recreancy,” which refers to perception that institutional actors have failed to carry out their responsibilities in a manner that engenders societal trust. Fishing households were significantly more likely to blame and be distrustful of institutional actors, a finding that is strongly consistent with theoretical expectations. Volume 81, Issue 3. https://scholarsarchive.byu.edu/facpub/3261, Copyright © 2016, by the Rural Sociological Society, Home | Enter your email address below and we will send you your username, If the address matches an existing account you will receive an email with instructions to retrieve your username, I have read and accept the Wiley Online Library Terms and Conditions of Use. Faculty Publications Please log in. > Matthew R. Lee, rural sociology, oil spill, oil spill blame. Fishing households were significantly more likely to blame and be distrustful of institutional actors, a finding that is strongly consistent with theoretical expectations. 3261, It's Not Whether You Win or Lose, It's How You Place the Blame: Shifting Perceptions of Recreancy in the Context of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill, Michael James Cope, Brigham Young UniversityFollow