Please enter the subject. Film version of a popular BBC radio show about the incompetent crew of a Royal Navy ship. Some features of WorldCat will not be available. Avoiding Redundancy), The Relief of the Weather Ship (a.k.a. Over the course of the series, it is revealed that Potarneyland had recently been granted independence from Great Britain, and had joined NATO because the Potanis considered it to be a "free gift scheme". The announcers would often interact with the show's characters and there were running gags over several episodes including Robin Boyle searching for a 15-sided nut or having a Saucy Lillian Gish calendar pinched, and Michael De Morgan's appearance or clothing being ridiculed by the crew. Accredited), Pertwee's Enlistment Expires (a.k.a. Episode on The Navy Lark:The Collection: Series 7. Part of an overseas service broadcast to the British Antartic Survey Teams at Christmas. "Ev'rybody down!" In series 1 and 2, the ship and crew were stationed offshore at an unnamed location known simply as "The Island". Scenes frequently featured a string of eccentric characters, often played by Ronnie Barker or Jon Pertwee. The change was not popular and due to public outcry the crew was soon back at sea. Unspecified illnesses include "the twingeing screws", an illness to which Pertwee was a martyr, especially when hearing about being under sailing orders. The buttons can be used to hide or display the Announcer Name, We Present, Episode Introduction or closing Have been for each episode. Pertwee's wheeling and dealing leaves Troutbridge in the firing line. This list (which may have dates, numbers, etc.). Also, whenever Pertwee had some menial job to be done, Able Seaman Johnson was always first in line to do it, inevitably against his will: "You're rotten, you are!". You may send this item to up to five recipients. Add lyrics on Musixmatch, Javascript is required to view shouts on this page. The revised show was recorded by local actors in front of a live audience. It also contains a booklet with programme notes, cast biographies and details of the missing episodes. Computerising), The Flying Machine (a.k.a. A three hour compilation of 6 episodes with links by Leslie Phillips, s01e02 Operation Fag End (5 April 1959) [pilot], s02e16 The Lighthouse Lark (29 January 1960), s05e03 A Deliberate Bashing (19 April 1963), s09e18 Mr Phillips at Dartmouth (29 October 1967). All the UK associations were kept for the Durban audiences which must have been incomprehensible on occasions. For most of its run, it starred Stephen …, THE NAVY LARK The Navy Lark was a radio sit-com about life aboard a British Royal Navy frigate named HMS Troutbridge, based in HMNB Portsmouth, though in series 1 and 2 the ship and crew we…, THE NAVY LARK The Navy Lark was a radio sit-com about life aboard a British Royal Navy frigate named HMS Troutbridge, based in HMNB Portsmouth, though in series 1 and 2 the ship and crew were stationed offshore at an unnamed location k…. Another excellent release of classic early `60's radio comedy from the BBC. Can a new credit card help? S-01 unaired Calling The Antarctic - Not broadcast in the UK. As Springbok Radio was a commercial station the BBC refused to allow the station to re-broadcast the British shows so the station acquired the scripts from Lawrie and edited them to around twenty five minutes, to accommodate the commercial breaks. Episodes of The Navy Lark series are still replayed in rotation on BBC Radio 4 Extra.[3]. All; Available now (2) Next on (9) Series 15 View episodes. Wyman co-wrote with three other writers a television sitcom HMS Paradise (Associated-Rediffusion, 1964-5) set in a naval shore establishment in which Caldicot played Captain Turvey, but only one series was made. A normal episode consisted of Sub Lt Phillips, scheming Chief Petty Officer Pertwee, and bemused Lt. Murray trying to get out of trouble they created for themselves without their direct superior, Commander (later Captain) "Thunderguts" Povey finding out. Please enter your name. Three of the first 14 episodes from series two of the Navy Lark are missing from the BBC Archives, but the recording scripts are included on Disc 6 of this set as .pdf files (for use on a PC or Mac computer). LARC-V (Lighter, Amphibious Resupply, Cargo, 5 ton), is an aluminium-hulled amphibious cargo vehicle capable of transporting 5 tons. Episodes were half an hour long and started with an announcer who presented the three stars of the show and closed the episode with a short phrase often starting 'Have been...'. Episode available as part of The Navy Lark 60th Anniversary release from Audible: but only as a bonus download, offered with the download-only version (not included on the CD-version). Lighting Up), Sub-Conductor Phillips (a.k.a. There were several radio sequels, including The Embassy Lark and The Big Business Lark. Storylines in The TV Lark nudged back to Naval origins across the ten shows until they were finally reunited with Troutbridge and acceptable storylines once more. The Navy Lark first aired on The Light Programme in 1959 and ran for fifteen series until 1976 making it one of the longest running radio programmes the BBC has made. Have Been Redecorating), Troutbridge's Silver Jubilee (a.k.a. S-03 Jul 16 77 Queen's Silver Jubilee Edition. Other recurring verbal features were the invented words "humgrummit" and "floggle-toggle" which served to cover all manner of unspecified objects ranging from foodstuffs to naval equipment. During Series 3 of The Navy Lark, a Potarneyland frigate, the Poppadom, appears in several episodes manned by various Potani officers voiced by Michael Bates and Ronnie Barker. It was produced by Alastair Scott-Johnston. More fun on the waves in this classic comedy, Sitcom about life aboard a British frigate named HMS Troutbridge, based in HMNB Portsmouth. Leave feedback, THE NAVY LARK The Navy Lark was a radio sit-com about life aboard a British Royal Navy frigate named HMS Troutbridge, based in HMNB Portsmouth, though in series 1 and 2 the ship and crew were stationed offshore at an unnamed location known simply as "The Island." Performance at the Royal Festival Hall to celebrate 21 years of the Women's Royal Naval Service. It was developed in the United States during the 1950s, and is used in a variety of auxiliary roles to this day.. Scenes frequently featured a string of eccentric characters, often played by Ronnie Barker or Jon Pertwee. The main characters of The Navy Lark are: Chief Petty Officer Pertwee played by Jon Pertwee, Sub Lieutenant Phillips played by Leslie Phillips and The Number One who was played by Dennis Price in the first series and Stephen Murray from then on. The programme also featured musical breaks with a main harmonica theme by Tommy Reilly and several enduring catchphrases, most notably from Sub Lieutenant Phillips: "Corrrrr", "Ooh, nasty...", "Oh lumme! Not broadcast in the UK. However, mainly due to public pressure, the production team of Alastair Scott Johnston and Laurie Wyman managed to revert the show to nautical capers. The entire crew had been drummed out of the service and hired by Troutbridge TV Ltd. Janet Brown joined the cast due to the absence of Heather Chasen for this series. First broadcast on 26th February 1960. Frustrating the Spark of Invention), Troutbridge in Quarantine (a.k.a. The show was condensed from 30 to 27 minutes by Transcription services, then the discs were then exported around the world except for South Africa. Included in Navy Lark Collection: Series 6 Part 2. The rest of the regular characters were played by Richard Caldicot, Ronnie Barker, Tenniel Evans, Michael Bates and Heather Chasen. Episode on The Navy Lark: The Collection: Series 12. Repeats can regularly be heard on BBC Radio 4 Extra. The Jubilee Navy Lark (The Queen's Silver Jubilee Edition), Assisting the Police with Their Enquiries for the Last Time in the Series, Dartmouth Naval College Has Had A Narrow Escape, The Navy Lark at OTR.Network (Old Time Radio), Obituary of Tenniel Evens in The Independent, https://thenavylark.fandom.com/wiki/The_Navy_Lark_(Series)?oldid=5539, 245. [2] Jon Pertwee is frequently quoted as having suggested the idea of a forces comedy based on the Royal Navy, but writer Laurie Wyman and Alastair Scott Johnston both contemplated an Air Force and an Army themed sit-com before going to the BBC with The Navy Lark. The Navy Lark was a BBC radio comedy written by Laurie Wyman and George Evans about the crew of The Royal Navy ship HMS Troutbridge, (a pun on HMS Troubridge, an actual Royal Navy destroyer) based in HMNB Portsmouth, though in series 1 and 2 the ship and crew were stationed offshore at an unnamed location known simply as "The Island." From the second series onwards the order alternated for each recording. The Navy Lark first aired on The Light Programme in 1959 and ran for fifteen series until 1976 making it one of the longest running radio programmes the BBC has made. Written by Laurie Wyman and Sid Colin and directed by Gordon Parry, it stars Cecil Parker, Ronald Shiner, Elvi Hale, Leslie Phillips and Nicholas Phipps. Everybody Down - The Navy Lark Wiki is a FANDOM Music Community. The Navy Lark, one of radio's laughter-makers, kept the nation on the crest of a comic wave from 1959 to 1977. All rights reserved. Some user-contributed text on this page is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply.